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FORMER EMPLOYEES SUE ZALES FOR SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Two former employees filed a lawsuit against Zales, the jewelry retailer, claiming that they were sexually harassed by their supervisor. According to the lawsuit, the plaintiffs’ supervisor subjected them to sexual harassment and a hostile work environment by physically touching them, staring at their bodies, and making inappropriate comments (of a sexual nature). The plaintiffs Read More

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UPS must pay $5.3M in Hostile Work Environment Lawsuit

Several Black Men sued UPS for Hostile Work Environment Exposure A total of 8 black UPS employees filed a race discrimination lawsuit in 2014 in Fayette Circuit Court against UPS located in Lexington, Kentucky. The plaintiffs named in this race discrimination lawsuit include William Barber, Lamont Brown, Jeffrey Goree, John Hughes, Glenn Jackson, Donald Ragland, Read More

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New York State’s Paid Family Leave

The New York State budget for 2016-2017, which was proposed by Governor Cuomo, included a Paid Family Leave (PFL) policy. PFL, when fully-enacted, will allow employees to take up to 12 weeks of leave to care for an infant or family member with a serious health condition. Employees are eligible to take leave after having Read More

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NJ Police Officers sue for Sexual Harassment

Twin Police Officers link to Sexual Harassment and Retaliation Suit New Jersey – Twin police officers, Angel and Luis Santiago, were named in a sexual harassment lawsuit filed in Cumberland County on behalf of five female officers who alleged they were subjected to “a plethora of sexual harassment” on the basis of gender. The sexual Read More

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MUSLIM DRIVERS AWARDED $240,000 IN EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION SUIT

An Illinois jury recently awarded $240,000 to a pair of Muslim men who believed they were terminated from their position of employment with a trucking company after both men refused to serve alcohol, a violation of their religious practices as devout Muslims. Chief U.S. District Judge James Shadid ruled that Star Transport Inc. had violated Read More

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SHOULD A WORKER BE COMPENSATED FOR THE TIME SPENT DRESSING IN SAFETY EQUIPMENT?

On November 10, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Tyson Foods v. Bouaphakeo, which involves a group of pork-processing workers in Iowa who claimed the meatpacking giant shorted them on overtime pay. The employees brought their claim under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) back in 2007, arguing they should have been Read More

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SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE KITCHEN

A recent New York court filing in Manhattan Supreme Court alleges that a female cook was sexually harassed and groped by the head chef at David Bouley’s restaurant in Tribeca (“Bouley Restaurant”). The female chef, Genevieve Germain, 27, accuses Head Chef Daniel Chavez of blowing kisses at her, ogling her breasts and brushing up against Read More

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EEOC RULES THAT SEXUAL ORIENTATION DISCRIMINATION IS UNLAWFUL UNDER TITLE VII

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has ruled that sexual orientation discrimination in the workplace is a form of illegal sex discrimination. According to the Commission, which passed the ruling in a 3-to-2 vote on July 16, 2015, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not explicitly prohibit sexual orientation discrimination. It does, however, Read More

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EEOC FINDS THAT NYC PAID MINORITY AND FEMALE WORKERS LESS THAN WHITE MALE COUNTERPARTS

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently found that New York City discriminated against women and minorities, paying them substantially less than their white male counterparts. The Commission issued its ruling after more than 1,000 administrative managers, represented by Local 1180 of the Communications Workers of America, filed a complaint against former Mayor Michael Read More

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EMPLOYERS MUST PROVIDE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR EMPLOYEES’ RELIGIOUS BELIEFS

The law states that employers must reasonably accommodate workers’ religious practices, unless doing so poses an undue hardship on their business. Several examples of reasonable religious accommodations include providing flexible scheduling for religious holidays, allowing religious dress and grooming, and making exceptions to workplace policies. Two recent lawsuits provide good examples of the extent to Read More

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COMMON QUESTIONS
What is Harassment?

Harassment consists of behavior that gets in the way of a person's work and responsibilities. The law protects employees from being harassed...

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Employees are generally protected in the workplace from discrimination due to sincerely held religious beliefs, but there are exceptions. Courts use a two-step...

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